Resources

Explore content produced by Milken Institute School of Public Health’s online graduate programs.

Local Officials Often Make Health Care Decisions with Little Input from Citizens

In 2016, U.S. state and local governments spend $558 billion on health care. And yet, each year, only 20 percent of eligible voters actually vote in local elections. We examined some offices related to health, health care, and public health that are decided by local elections, the types of decisions that come with those positions, and the consequences of not voting.

Is Renting Bad for Your Health? How Renters Can Ensure Safe and Secure Housing

When people turn to short-term housing for affordability and convenience, they have to be vigilant about the state of their housing. Renters can be exposed to carbon monoxide, lead, mold, indoor air pollution and poor water quality. Substandard rental housing might put tenants at risk, and renters typically have to rely on landlords for home improvements.

Drinking Water and Lead Service Lines: Partnering to Protect Public Health

Join us for a discussion focused on lead service line replacement within the broader context of tackling all sources of lead. The event will address the health risk of lead service lines, the role of public health professionals in the replacement process, and the importance of effective partnerships between public health agencies and water utilities to develop creative solutions.

Understanding Medicare for All

Since Senator Bernie Sanders proposed his plan for Medicare for All in mid-September, more than 16 Democrat senators have voiced their support for a single-payer system. Professor Sara Rosenbaum discusses what “single-payer” actually means, and the questions we should be asking about it.

What’s the Effect of Guilt Appeal?

The answer to that question may depend on where the guilt appeal is coming from. Monique Turner’s recent article, “The Effects of Guilt-Appeal Intensity on Persuasive and Emotional Outcomes: The Moderating Role of Sponsor Motive,” explores how an ad’s intention can affect people’s reaction to its message.

How Bacteria Build Resistance at the Cellular Level

Bacterial cells, not people, become resistant to antibiotics. MPH@GW worked with The Antibiotic Resistance Action Center (ARAC) at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University to create a series of graphics that illustrates the interaction between antibiotics and bacterial cells within your body.